Whittled Words – Kyrielle Poem



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Welcome to the weekly series, Whittled Words. A series highlighting the innumerable types and styles of poetry to challenge any creative wordsmith. This week’s selection:

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KYRIELLE POEM

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The kyrielle is a French four-line stanza (quatrain) form that has a refrain in the fourth line. Often, there is a rhyme scheme in the poem consisting of the following possibilities:

aabB

abaB

aaaB

abcB

 

The poem can be any length you wish and as short as two stanzas (otherwise, the refrain is not really a refrain, is it?), and, as with many French forms, it is great way to stretch your poetic muscles.

Also, tres importante! Although there is no requirement for meter, your lines must contain 8 syllables. You did not think it was going to be that easy, did you?

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Examples of Kyrielle Poems:

 

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THANK YOU JANE

By Suzanne Honour

We’ve known each other many years
Had lots of laughs and cried some tears
Our separate lives just seem to blend
Thank you for being my best friend

You’ve shared my joy and felt my pain
When I went mad you made me sane
If I’m confused you comprehend
Thank you for being my best friend

When you’re in need you ask for me
You treat me like I’m family
My honour you always defend
Thank you for being my best friend

For you I have so much respect
I know my feeling is correct
You never judge or condescend
Thank you for being my best friend

We’ve known each other many years
Had lots of laughs and cried some tears
Our separate lives just seem to blend
Thank you for being my best friend

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MY BOUQUET

 

By Floria Kelderhouse

Some days I sing, some days I cry.

My soul’s the one determines why.

Sometimes it laughs, sometimes it mourns.

On my bouquet are many thorns.

Wake up each day, face a dark cloud.

My happiness wrapped in a shroud.

The day begins; to me it scorns.

On my bouquet are many thorns.

Lay down my head, dark nights begun.

With the sad setting of the sun.

From all my sorrows my heart mourns.

On my bouquet are many thorns.

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GLADLY, THE CROSS-EYED BEAR

By M Lee Dickens

 

 

When I was young I think I had

a teddy bear when I was sad;

one day in church, this broke my stare:

they sang, “Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear.”

A bear who shared my teddy’s name…

but he can’t see straight?  What a shame!

Would they make fun of him?  Not fair;

they sang, “Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear.”

The months passed on; I puzzled more

when once it woke me from a snore

with bubble gum stuck in my hair.

They sang, “Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear.”

Months turned to years; then I sang too

that song.  Its meaning?  I’d no clue…

but couldn’t ask; I didn’t dare.

They sang, “Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear.”

“Take up your cross and follow Him,”

the preacher cited… chose that hymn.

Then suddenly I was aware…

they sang, “Gladly the cross I’d bear.”

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THE POETS PAST

 

By Brad Osborne

 

 

We the find the beauty of our world

Within each of the practiced lines

Feelings strung out like perfect pearls

Found in the rhythm and the rhyme

In yellowed pages old and curled

The gift from sages of our times

Thoughts unwound like a flag unfurled

Found in the rhythm and the rhyme

Such treasures in these words are squirreled

Where truth melds with beauty sublime

A languaged tapestry well burled

Found in the rhythm and the rhyme

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I hope you have enjoyed this entry to the series, Whittled Words. I look forward to your comments, and if you dare, maybe share your own Kyrielle poem. Thanks for reading!

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Comments
10 Responses to “Whittled Words – Kyrielle Poem”
  1. beth says:

    love the poets past and the ‘crossed-eyed’ bear

  2. Enjoyed all of the poems you shared. The one about “Gladly, the cross-eyed bear” was intriguing!

  3. Jim Borden says:

    I like the style of this poem. And I am impressed – rhyming squirreled and burled!

  4. Lovely poem you’ve written to exemplify this very nice and for me very interesting form. What can be found in the “rhythm and the rhyme”? A different world?
    All the best to you my friend!
    FBC.

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